Posts Tagged: black and white

Gabriel Benaim : “Wall Art” Series (Photography)

I photograph in order to learn something new about what’s in front of me. The process of photographing is, for me, one of discovering visual interest in the myriad forms presented to us, and of overcoming the habits that make our perceptions grow dull. Against Duchamp, I believe in retinal art, and attempt in my work to avoid preconceptions and formulas.

Gabriel Benaim : “Wall Art” Series (Photography)

I photograph in order to learn something new about what’s in front of me. The process of photographing is, for me, one of discovering visual interest in the myriad forms presented to us, and of overcoming the habits that make our perceptions grow dull. Against Duchamp, I believe in retinal art, and attempt in my work to avoid preconceptions and formulas.

Yojiro Imasaka : “New Works” (Photography)

In Imasaka’s photographic investigation of urban space in New York and Chicago, he has found a unique perspective on the tall buildings that create these cities skylines. Shooting straight up between adjacent tall buildings towards the sky, he creates a narrow vista, like a long tunnel, that ends in open sky; up and down are reversed and the viewer feels as if he were standing over a bottomless abyss.

Yojiro Imasaka : “New Works” (Photography)

In Imasaka’s photographic investigation of urban space in New York and Chicago, he has found a unique perspective on the tall buildings that create these cities skylines. Shooting straight up between adjacent tall buildings towards the sky, he creates a narrow vista, like a long tunnel, that ends in open sky; up and down are reversed and the viewer feels as if he were standing over a bottomless abyss.

Hiroshi Sugimoto : ‘Drive Ins’ (Photography)

The New York-based Japanese artist Hiroshi Sugimoto produces photographs in series. He meticulously selects and then researches subjects, returning to the same few time and time again, taking pictures and then producing technically immaculate black and white prints of absorbing clarity and density. Since the late 1970s, Sugimoto has worked on several series that have together encompassed seascapes, dioramas, movie theatres and drive-ins.

Hiroshi Sugimoto : ‘Drive Ins’ (Photography)

The New York-based Japanese artist Hiroshi Sugimoto produces photographs in series. He meticulously selects and then researches subjects, returning to the same few time and time again, taking pictures and then producing technically immaculate black and white prints of absorbing clarity and density. Since the late 1970s, Sugimoto has worked on several series that have together encompassed seascapes, dioramas, movie theatres and drive-ins.

Taku Aramasa : Photography (Pinhole Camera)

Presented in Sakura are black and white pinhole photographs of the glorious displays of blooming cherry trees at the time of Sakura Matsuri, the annual cherry blossom festival in Japan. Aramasa employs the pinhole process for this series, a primitive photographic technique that functions like a miniature camera obscura, where light passes through tiny opening in a lensless camera and registers the image directly on film.

Taku Aramasa : Photography (Pinhole Camera)

Presented in Sakura are black and white pinhole photographs of the glorious displays of blooming cherry trees at the time of Sakura Matsuri, the annual cherry blossom festival in Japan. Aramasa employs the pinhole process for this series, a primitive photographic technique that functions like a miniature camera obscura, where light passes through tiny opening in a lensless camera and registers the image directly on film.

Matthew Pillsbury : ‘Screens’ Series (Photography)

“A photograph can reveal extraordinary visual truths that lie beyond the limits of our perception of the world. We all know that in using a short exposure, a photograph can capture things we cannot see. A celebrated example is Muybridge’s study of the biomechanics of a galloping horse. In using much longer exposures, from a few minutes to over an hour, I seek truths and beauty in our everyday world that are equally surprising to us.” Matthew Pillsbury

Matthew Pillsbury : ‘Screens’ Series (Photography)

“A photograph can reveal extraordinary visual truths that lie beyond the limits of our perception of the world. We all know that in using a short exposure, a photograph can capture things we cannot see. A celebrated example is Muybridge’s study of the biomechanics of a galloping horse. In using much longer exposures, from a few minutes to over an hour, I seek truths and beauty in our everyday world that are equally surprising to us.” Matthew Pillsbury

Michael Flomen : Photograms

In his large-format, black-and-white photographs, Flomen captivates our optic and draws it toward what is hidden in plain sight, sequestered between darkness and the light. He draws our attention to the liminal spaces that exist between tenses, conditions of matter, and even states of being.

Michael Flomen : Photograms

In his large-format, black-and-white photographs, Flomen captivates our optic and draws it toward what is hidden in plain sight, sequestered between darkness and the light. He draws our attention to the liminal spaces that exist between tenses, conditions of matter, and even states of being.

Mitch Dobrowner : Photography

Landscapes are living eco systems and environments. They have existed well before, and will hopefully be here way beyond the time we are here. When taking photographs, time and space seem hard for me to measure. Whenever I shoot a ‘quality’ image, I know it. At those moments things are quiet, seem simple again – and I obtain a respect and reverence for the world that is hard to communicate through words.

Mitch Dobrowner : Photography

Landscapes are living eco systems and environments. They have existed well before, and will hopefully be here way beyond the time we are here. When taking photographs, time and space seem hard for me to measure. Whenever I shoot a ‘quality’ image, I know it. At those moments things are quiet, seem simple again – and I obtain a respect and reverence for the world that is hard to communicate through words.

Nathan Harger : Photography

Nathan Harger photographs the infrastructure that powers American industry: Cranes, telephone wires, airplanes, bridges, factories, more telephone wires. What others use for commerce and profit, Harger makes into art. Harger started art school planning to become a designer, but fell in love with the “instant gratification” of photography.

Nathan Harger : Photography

Nathan Harger photographs the infrastructure that powers American industry: Cranes, telephone wires, airplanes, bridges, factories, more telephone wires. What others use for commerce and profit, Harger makes into art. Harger started art school planning to become a designer, but fell in love with the “instant gratification” of photography.

Christian Coigny : ‘Still Life’ Series (Photography)

Based near Lausanne on the shores of Lake Geneva, Christian Coigny has for the past 30 years developed a career in traditional black and white photography in parallel to his work in publicity and fashion. Christian works primarily with film. His work is anchored in a classical education and is strongly influenced by American painters such as Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keefe or Andrew Wyeth…

Christian Coigny : ‘Still Life’ Series (Photography)

Based near Lausanne on the shores of Lake Geneva, Christian Coigny has for the past 30 years developed a career in traditional black and white photography in parallel to his work in publicity and fashion. Christian works primarily with film. His work is anchored in a classical education and is strongly influenced by American painters such as Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keefe or Andrew Wyeth…

Linda Butler : Photography Series

“When I originally took up photography it was to photograph nature in the style of Ansel Adams and Edward Weston. Even though most of my work has moved in a different direction, I continue to love to immerse myself in the landscape, trying to push the envelope to go beyond the beautiful.” Linda Butler

Linda Butler : Photography Series

“When I originally took up photography it was to photograph nature in the style of Ansel Adams and Edward Weston. Even though most of my work has moved in a different direction, I continue to love to immerse myself in the landscape, trying to push the envelope to go beyond the beautiful.” Linda Butler

Nicholas Alan Cope : ‘Architecture’ Series (Photography)

a selection of black & white architectural photography series…

Nicholas Alan Cope : ‘Architecture’ Series (Photography)

a selection of black & white architectural photography series…

Azurebumble : ‘Bridge to Bridge’ (Photography)

a selection of monochrome, minimal photographs of the Tay Railway Bridge’…

Azurebumble : ‘Bridge to Bridge’ (Photography)

a selection of monochrome, minimal photographs of the Tay Railway Bridge’…

Alec Cheer : New York Series (Photography)

a selection of black and white photographs of New York…

Alec Cheer : New York Series (Photography)

a selection of black and white photographs of New York…

Daniel Hachmann : ‘Urban Tribes’ Series (Photography)

Daniel Hachmann`s work reflects his inner self as it reflects the world around him.

Daniel Hachmann : ‘Urban Tribes’ Series (Photography)

Daniel Hachmann`s work reflects his inner self as it reflects the world around him.

Martin Bogren : “Isola” Series (Photography)

Martin Bogren is a photographer based in Malmo/Sweden. His work stems from a personal documentary tradition and often contains a poetic sensibility. Recently Martin has exhibited in Scandinavia, USA, France, Poland and Italy. His project ‘Lowland’ is to be exhibited at Fotografiska in Stockholm in September 2011 and the book will be published by Max Ström in connection with this exhibition.

Martin Bogren : “Isola” Series (Photography)

Martin Bogren is a photographer based in Malmo/Sweden. His work stems from a personal documentary tradition and often contains a poetic sensibility. Recently Martin has exhibited in Scandinavia, USA, France, Poland and Italy. His project ‘Lowland’ is to be exhibited at Fotografiska in Stockholm in September 2011 and the book will be published by Max Ström in connection with this exhibition.

Alexey Titarenko : “St. Petersburg” Series (Photography)

“Titarenko presents the city as mystical and eerie, a reflection of the many tragedies that occurred there throughout the 20th century. His key inspiration is not contemporary photographic practice, but rather music, and particularly that of Shostakovich. His black-and-white pictures allow for details that situate the scene in time and place. Many photographers have employed “blur”, but Titarenko applies it to street photography, transforming straight reportage into haunting poetry.” Barbara Pollack

Alexey Titarenko : “St. Petersburg” Series (Photography)

“Titarenko presents the city as mystical and eerie, a reflection of the many tragedies that occurred there throughout the 20th century. His key inspiration is not contemporary photographic practice, but rather music, and particularly that of Shostakovich. His black-and-white pictures allow for details that situate the scene in time and place. Many photographers have employed “blur”, but Titarenko applies it to street photography, transforming straight reportage into haunting poetry.” Barbara Pollack

László Moholy-Nagy : Photograms

“László Moholy-Nagy is a world-famous figure of twentieth-century avant-garde art. His visual art and theoretical works, photographs, films, educational activities and photograms – taken without a camera and now synonymous with his name – were of such significance that it is no exaggeration to say that since Moholy-Nagy, we see things differently; since Moholy-Nagy, our thinking about art has been transformed. His innovations over the decades have become so natural, his influence so pervasive, that we now almost have to rediscover him once again.

László Moholy-Nagy : Photograms

“László Moholy-Nagy is a world-famous figure of twentieth-century avant-garde art. His visual art and theoretical works, photographs, films, educational activities and photograms – taken without a camera and now synonymous with his name – were of such significance that it is no exaggeration to say that since Moholy-Nagy, we see things differently; since Moholy-Nagy, our thinking about art has been transformed. His innovations over the decades have become so natural, his influence so pervasive, that we now almost have to rediscover him once again.

Clifford Ross ‘Hurricanes’ (Photography)

It took Clifford Ross a few years of photographing hurricanes and being dissatisfied with the results before he realized that the central drama was in the ocean. And that if he wanted to capture it, he’d have to get in it. “There’s an apocryphal tale that Turner lashed himself to a ship’s mast” says Ross describing the 19th century painter’s desire to depict stormy seas.

Clifford Ross ‘Hurricanes’ (Photography)

It took Clifford Ross a few years of photographing hurricanes and being dissatisfied with the results before he realized that the central drama was in the ocean. And that if he wanted to capture it, he’d have to get in it. “There’s an apocryphal tale that Turner lashed himself to a ship’s mast” says Ross describing the 19th century painter’s desire to depict stormy seas.

Kevin Saint Grey : Photography (Architecture)

Kevin Saint Grey is a photographer with a minimalist aesthetic. In an way, his images are understimulating. This has the effect that you tend to ‘fill’ them with a little bit of yourself. Or, as one of his followers says in a testimonial: “I get lost in them.”

Kevin Saint Grey : Photography (Architecture)

Kevin Saint Grey is a photographer with a minimalist aesthetic. In an way, his images are understimulating. This has the effect that you tend to ‘fill’ them with a little bit of yourself. Or, as one of his followers says in a testimonial: “I get lost in them.”

Lynne Cohen : ‘Interior Spaces’ (Photography)

Cohen is known for her photographs of domestic and institutional interior spaces, which have included living rooms, public halls, retirement homes, laboratories, offices, showrooms, shooting ranges, factories, spas, and military installations. Despite this interest in living and working spaces, Cohen’s photographs are usually devoid of human presence. She photographs using an 8 x 10″ view camera.

Lynne Cohen : ‘Interior Spaces’ (Photography)

Cohen is known for her photographs of domestic and institutional interior spaces, which have included living rooms, public halls, retirement homes, laboratories, offices, showrooms, shooting ranges, factories, spas, and military installations. Despite this interest in living and working spaces, Cohen’s photographs are usually devoid of human presence. She photographs using an 8 x 10″ view camera.

Lord Jezzer : Photography Series (Architecture)

a selection of black and white, architectural and abstract photography…

Lord Jezzer : Photography Series (Architecture)

a selection of black and white, architectural and abstract photography…

Daniel Molina : Photography Series

a selection of black and white, architectural and abstract photography…

Daniel Molina : Photography Series

a selection of black and white, architectural and abstract photography…

Marc Riboud : Photography Series

French photographer Marc Riboud isn’t easily categorized, because he’s never specialized in any particular area of photography. There are some recurring themes and stylistic idiosyncrasies in his work, but the pictures fall easily into half a dozen different modes of photography. He describes himself as a “shy” photographer, saying “I was torn between the fear of getting too close to people and another force that egged me on to get a closer look.”

Marc Riboud : Photography Series

French photographer Marc Riboud isn’t easily categorized, because he’s never specialized in any particular area of photography. There are some recurring themes and stylistic idiosyncrasies in his work, but the pictures fall easily into half a dozen different modes of photography. He describes himself as a “shy” photographer, saying “I was torn between the fear of getting too close to people and another force that egged me on to get a closer look.”