Posts Tagged: high-contrast

Black Opal : Photography

a selection of abstract, black and white, street photography…

Black Opal : Photography

a selection of abstract, black and white, street photography…

Nathan Harger : Photography

Nathan Harger photographs the infrastructure that powers American industry: Cranes, telephone wires, airplanes, bridges, factories, more telephone wires. What others use for commerce and profit, Harger makes into art. Harger started art school planning to become a designer, but fell in love with the “instant gratification” of photography.

Nathan Harger : Photography

Nathan Harger photographs the infrastructure that powers American industry: Cranes, telephone wires, airplanes, bridges, factories, more telephone wires. What others use for commerce and profit, Harger makes into art. Harger started art school planning to become a designer, but fell in love with the “instant gratification” of photography.

Daido Moriyama : Photography Series

Daido Moriyama (b.1938, Osaka) is one of Japan’s leading figures in photography. Witness to the spectacular changes that transformed post WWII Japan, his black and white photographs express a fascination with the cultural contradictions of age-old traditions that persist within modern society. Providing a harsh, crude vision of city life and the chaos of everyday existence,

Daido Moriyama : Photography Series

Daido Moriyama (b.1938, Osaka) is one of Japan’s leading figures in photography. Witness to the spectacular changes that transformed post WWII Japan, his black and white photographs express a fascination with the cultural contradictions of age-old traditions that persist within modern society. Providing a harsh, crude vision of city life and the chaos of everyday existence,

Jehsong Baak : Photography Series

Baak freely acknowledges that Robert Frank and Joself Koudelka have served as inspirational mentors in his work. The parallels in the lives of these three photographers are striking as are the basic themes of their work. Yet Baak maintains his own visual language and context that is complex and poignant, creating a personal path so that his work serves as confessions and insights into his persona and life.

Jehsong Baak : Photography Series

Baak freely acknowledges that Robert Frank and Joself Koudelka have served as inspirational mentors in his work. The parallels in the lives of these three photographers are striking as are the basic themes of their work. Yet Baak maintains his own visual language and context that is complex and poignant, creating a personal path so that his work serves as confessions and insights into his persona and life.

Takuma Nakahira: For a Language to Come (Photography Series)

Takahira wrote that “Extremely grainy images and intentionally unfocussed photographs in particular, have already become mere decoration.” I can think of many examples where that might be true, but Nakahira’s case, it most definitely is not.

Takuma Nakahira: For a Language to Come (Photography Series)

Takahira wrote that “Extremely grainy images and intentionally unfocussed photographs in particular, have already become mere decoration.” I can think of many examples where that might be true, but Nakahira’s case, it most definitely is not.

Takuma Nakahira: For a Language to Come (Photography Series 2)

“For a Language to Come” is recorded in the history of photography as the first photobook by Takuma Nakahira, the photographer who brought about a turning point in contemporary Japanese photography from the late 1960s to the early 1970s

Takuma Nakahira: For a Language to Come (Photography Series 2)

“For a Language to Come” is recorded in the history of photography as the first photobook by Takuma Nakahira, the photographer who brought about a turning point in contemporary Japanese photography from the late 1960s to the early 1970s

Masahisa Fukase: The Solitude of Ravens (Photography Series)

Masahisa Fukase is considered to be both a legend and an enigma in his native Japan. For a culture that is traditionally reluctant to expose emotion in public, the expressionistic character of his work was, in part, the result of the development of the generation that evolved after WWII.

Masahisa Fukase: The Solitude of Ravens (Photography Series)

Masahisa Fukase is considered to be both a legend and an enigma in his native Japan. For a culture that is traditionally reluctant to expose emotion in public, the expressionistic character of his work was, in part, the result of the development of the generation that evolved after WWII.