Posts Tagged: process

Arthur Ou : ‘Test Screens’ Series (Photo-Media)

Arthur Ou is a Taiwanese artist currently living and working in New York. He is an Associate Professor of Photography at Parsons New School for Design in New York and is exhibiting in Sydney for the first time. He is showing a selection from his Test Screens series of innovative landscape photo-media works in which he intentionally interferes with the direct view by incorporating a layer of ‘drawing’ or ‘painting’ with light into the photographic space.

Arthur Ou : ‘Test Screens’ Series (Photo-Media)

Arthur Ou is a Taiwanese artist currently living and working in New York. He is an Associate Professor of Photography at Parsons New School for Design in New York and is exhibiting in Sydney for the first time. He is showing a selection from his Test Screens series of innovative landscape photo-media works in which he intentionally interferes with the direct view by incorporating a layer of ‘drawing’ or ‘painting’ with light into the photographic space.

Kikuji Kawada : ‘Chizu – The Map’ Series (Photography Book)

No photobook has been more successful in combining graphic design with complex photographic narrative… [as its] various layers inside [are] peeled away like archaeological strata, the whole process of viewing the book becomes one of uncovering and contemplating the ramifications of recent Japanese history

Kikuji Kawada : ‘Chizu – The Map’ Series (Photography Book)

No photobook has been more successful in combining graphic design with complex photographic narrative… [as its] various layers inside [are] peeled away like archaeological strata, the whole process of viewing the book becomes one of uncovering and contemplating the ramifications of recent Japanese history

Stephen Inggs : Photography Series

These works consists of powerful yet delicate large scale photographs, each one hand-coated with silver gelatin emulsion onto 100% cotton mould-made paper, using traditional techniques. The handmade, tactile and physical aspects of this process are used to underline the references to history, transience and the overlooked object. Each piece is therefore a unique and original work of art.

Stephen Inggs : Photography Series

These works consists of powerful yet delicate large scale photographs, each one hand-coated with silver gelatin emulsion onto 100% cotton mould-made paper, using traditional techniques. The handmade, tactile and physical aspects of this process are used to underline the references to history, transience and the overlooked object. Each piece is therefore a unique and original work of art.

Hans-Christian Schink : ’1h’ Series (Photography)

Photography is centered on light and time. Typically, they’re not independent – the amount of light available tends to determine the amount of time needed for a photograph. Exposure usually needs to be done properly, because not doing so results in all kinds of unwanted effects, such as under or overexposed images. Of course, this needn’t necessarily be bad.

Hans-Christian Schink : ’1h’ Series (Photography)

Photography is centered on light and time. Typically, they’re not independent – the amount of light available tends to determine the amount of time needed for a photograph. Exposure usually needs to be done properly, because not doing so results in all kinds of unwanted effects, such as under or overexposed images. Of course, this needn’t necessarily be bad.

Michelle Kloehn : Unseen (Tintype Series)

I started using the wet plate technique eight years ago, when I went off to a residency and holed myself up in the darkroom until I figured out how the process worked. From there I have created several bodies of work- each one generating more questions for myself. Lately I have been thinking about light and shadow, about abstraction and representation, about the difference between what we think we see and what we want to see.

Michelle Kloehn : Unseen (Tintype Series)

I started using the wet plate technique eight years ago, when I went off to a residency and holed myself up in the darkroom until I figured out how the process worked. From there I have created several bodies of work- each one generating more questions for myself. Lately I have been thinking about light and shadow, about abstraction and representation, about the difference between what we think we see and what we want to see.

Stephan Tillmans : Light Point Systems (Photography)

The dot orders are television screens, which were photographed at the moment of being turned off. The shutter button is pressed when the power switch on the television is pressed. The camera captures the image in the moment when it breaks down. The television picture is no longer visible – instead, a structure of light, which in a fraction of a second, disappears in the picture tube and collapses.

Stephan Tillmans : Light Point Systems (Photography)

The dot orders are television screens, which were photographed at the moment of being turned off. The shutter button is pressed when the power switch on the television is pressed. The camera captures the image in the moment when it breaks down. The television picture is no longer visible – instead, a structure of light, which in a fraction of a second, disappears in the picture tube and collapses.

Osheen Harruthoonyan: ‘Black Garden’ Series (Photography)

“It’s easy to lose sight of exactly who you are while passing through the ‘Black Garden’. At the start, things are clear, there’s you and there’s the land, you each have your names and the division is simple.

Osheen Harruthoonyan: ‘Black Garden’ Series (Photography)

“It’s easy to lose sight of exactly who you are while passing through the ‘Black Garden’. At the start, things are clear, there’s you and there’s the land, you each have your names and the division is simple.

Barbara Kasten : Studio Constructs (Photographs)

“The process of capturing an image through a camera lens requires “an object.” This body of work addresses the representational value of that object. By photographing a transparent plane, and its shadow, familiar association with life experience is eliminated. The result is a “concrete photographic” abstract image.”[bk]

Barbara Kasten : Studio Constructs (Photographs)

“The process of capturing an image through a camera lens requires “an object.” This body of work addresses the representational value of that object. By photographing a transparent plane, and its shadow, familiar association with life experience is eliminated. The result is a “concrete photographic” abstract image.”[bk]